The Democratic Union of Freedom – Wikipedia

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The Democratic Union of Freedom
Based at Bălți, USSR
Sort Conspirative Anti-Communist Organisation
Felony standing Disbanded
Objective Liberation of Bessarabia from the Soviet Union
Headquarters Bălți

Reliable language

Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian
Chief Anatol Miliutin, Nicolai Postol

Key other people

Simion Untu, Nicolae Spinu, Boris Novac

The Democratic Union of Freedom was once an anti-communist conspiracy group from Bălți[1][2]. The leaders of the group have been Anatol Miliutin and Nicolai Postol[3].

Process[edit]

In February 1951, Anatol Miliutin made the primary enchantment to the inhabitants, calling within the battle for the overthrow of Soviet energy and the liquidation of the communist order. Following his first agitation actions, the group attracted about 30 other people, in equivalent proportions: Romanians, Ukrainians and Russians.[4]

The primary goals of the The Democratic Union of Freedom (UDL) was once to liquidate the Soviet energy in Bessarabia via an armed rebellion and to determine a society in keeping with democracy and personal belongings. A number of the present duties of the group have been: the advance of anti-Soviet agitation a few of the inhabitants, the co-optation of latest contributors, dissemination of anti-Soviet leaflets, organising touch with different anti-soviet forces to procure guns and ammunition.

Anatol Miliutin declared that the peoples of Russia have suffered and can undergo so long as Stalinism lives, and the one manner out could be a liberation via revolution. In his opinion, handiest with
with the assistance of guns, the aspirations of this revolution may well be translated into existence, particularly:

  • Liquidation of collective farms and distribution of land and method of manufacturing.
  • Freedom of speech, press, meeting, confession and trust.
  • Liberation of idea, introduction, science and artwork.
  • Inviolability of the individual.
  • Equitable remuneration for paintings.
  • Freedom of personal initiative.
  • Inviolability of all kinds of personal belongings.

Anatol Miliutin known as on all contributors of the Democratic Union of Freedom to team themselves in detachments, to assault the army devices of the Communists, to disarm them and arm themselves, to unlock prisoners and to draw birthday party contributors on their facet , as a result of “there are truthful other people too amongst them”.[5]

Within the means of co-opting the brand new contributors, a number of teams of the UDL have been shaped. Two teams have been lively within the villages of Ivanovca and Gura Căinarului within the Floreşti district. One team was once shaped on the Locomotive Station and two on the sugar manufacturing unit in Bălţi.

Anatol Miliutin and Nicolai Postol shaped a committee to workout the function a real heart of management of the group. This committee integrated former soldier within the Romanian Military Simion Untu, trainer Nicolae Spinu from the village of Gura Căinarului and sugar manufacturing unit employee Boris Novac. All 3 applicants knew Romanian and Russian neatly, they have been skilled other people and because of this they have been regarded as faithful for the advance of anti-Soviet task within the Romanian inhabitants.[6]

The Democratic Union of Freedom has been lively for not up to a 12 months, earlier than the primary arrest of a member of the group came about on fifteenth October 1951. After many years, one of the most leaders of the group, Simion Untu, would testify that the group’s dismemberment passed off on account of an “data leak” from the contributors infiltrated into the group by means of the Romanian secret products and services, the Securitate.[7][8]

Convicted Individuals[edit]

  • Anatol Miliutin – b. 1925, Kamashev (reg. Rostov, RSFSR, USSR), Russian, buyer of the rural artillery “Lenin” in Balti; sentenced to demise by means of taking pictures.
  • Nicolai Postol – b. 1925, Bocikari (reg. Novosibirsk, RSFSR, USSR), Russian, adjuster on the depot of Balti-Slobozia Station; sentenced to demise by means of taking pictures.
  • Simion Untu – b. 1922, Gura Căinarului village (Soroca, Romania), Romanian, former soldier within the Romanian Military, mill employee from his local village, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights inside of 5 years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Boris Novac – b. 1925, Bădiceni village (Soroca, Romania), Romanian, employee on the Sugar Manufacturing facility in Bălți, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation wealth.
  • Vasile Barbovschi – b. 1925, Bădiceni village (Soroca, Romania), Romanian, warehouse supervisor on the Sugar Manufacturing facility in Bălți, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Vasile Hriplivâi – b. 1923, Căinarii Vechi village (Soroca, Romania), Ukrainian, porter on the Sugar Manufacturing facility in Bălți, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Piotr Kapusta – b. 1912, Ivanovca village (Soroca, Russian Empire), Ukrainian, kolkhoz, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Alexei Coval – b. 1910, Rașcov village (Podolia, Russian Empire), Ukrainian, mill employee in his native land, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation wealth.
  • Sava Lopatinski – b. 1896, Șebutînți village, (Podolia, Russian Empire), Russian, locksmith on the Bălți Brewery, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Kondrat Boris – b. 1906, Pocrovca village (Hotin, Russian Empire), Russian, employee on the Bălți Sugar Manufacturing facility, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Maxim Hrapcenkov – b. 1915, Pocrovca village (Hotin, Russian Empire), Russian, employee on the Bălți Sugar Manufacturing facility, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Artiom Borisov – b. 1918, Dobrogea Veche village (Bălți, Romania), Russian, employee on the Bălți Sugar Manufacturing facility, sentenced to ten years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years.
  • Porfirii Silivestrov – b. 1911, Pocrovca village (Hotin, Russian Empire), Russian, employee on the Bălți Sugar Manufacturing facility, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Ivan Kovaliov – b. 1911, Pocrovca village (Hotin, Russian Empire), Russian, employee on the Bălți Sugar Manufacturing facility, sentenced to ten years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years.
  • Akim Borisov – b. 1911, Pocrovca village (Hotin, Russian Empire), Russian, employee on the Bălți Sugar Manufacturing facility, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Ivan Eșan – b. 1921, Bălți, Russian, cart motive force on the town street directorate in Bălți, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Alexandr Korceak – b. 1922, Medveja village (Hotin, Romania), Ukrainian, porter at Moara no. 5 from Bălți, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Grigori Pelevaniuc – b. 1919, s Ivanovca, (Soroca, Romania), Ukrainian, porter at Bălți-Slobozia Railway Station, sentenced to ten years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years.
  • Mihail Doneț – b. 1922, Codreanca village, (Hotin, Romania), Ukrainian, porter on the Bălți Sugar Manufacturing facility, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for a length of five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Dumitru Pădureț – b. 1920, Gura Căinarului village, (Soroca, Romania), Moldovan, kolkhoz, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Alexandru Gonța – b. 1919, Gura Căinarului village, (Soroca, Russian Empire), Moldavian, kolkhoz, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Djupo Golentunder – b. 1922, Palešnik village, (Belovara, Serbo-Croatian-Slovenian Kingdom), Croatian, employee on the Bălți Sugar Manufacturing facility, sentenced to twenty-five years of detention in hard work camps, with suspension of civil rights for five years and confiscation of belongings.
  • Nicolai Usatâi – b. 1912, Pocrovca village (Bălți, Russian Empire), Ukrainian, brigadier within the native kolkhoz, sentenced to ten years of detention in hard work camps, with the suspension of civil rights for five years.
  1. ^ Vlad Spânu. 88 years for the reason that union: in a whose arms is the destiny of Bessarabia?. moldova.org, April 2, 2006. Accessed October 9, 2011.
  2. ^ Claudia Matei, Gheorghe Chivu. Poetry of resistance to totalitarian regimes – Romanian and Ecu coordinates.
  3. ^ Elena Postică. Why must the anti-communist resistance be delivered to gentle?. Morning Time , 16 April 2010. Accessed 9 October 2011.
  4. ^ Ştefan Tudor, „Recul. Comitetul revoluţionar pentru eliberarea popoarelor Rusiei”, în Basarabia, nr. 6, 1993, p. 152.
  5. ^ ASISRM-KGB, f. 018218, d.p. 6168, vol. 8, ff. 4-5.
  6. ^ Ştefan Tudor, „Вся жизнь в плену”, în Независимая Молдова, 15 septembrie 1993.
  7. ^ ASISRM-KGB, f. 018218, d.p. 6168, vol. 8, f. 87.
  8. ^ Ştefan Tudor, „Вся жизнь в плену”, în Независимая Молдова, 15 septembrie 1993.


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