Young Hero (1785 ship) – Wikipedia

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Liverpool slave send (1785–1794

Historical past
Nice Britain
Title ‘Younger Hero
Proprietor
Introduced 1786, Liverpool
Destiny Condemned 1794
Basic traits
Lots burthen 79, or 80, or 100[3] (bm)
Duration 64 feet 6 in (19.7 m)
Beam 17 feet 6 in (5.3 m)
Sail plan Brigantine
Notes Two decks & two masts

Younger Hero was once introduced at Liverpool in 1785. She made six whole voyages as a slave send within the triangular business in enslaved other folks. She was once seized and condemned in 1794 after having landed the slaves from her 7th voyage.

Younger Hero first seemed in Lloyd’s Sign up (LR) in 1786.[3]

Yr Grasp Proprietor Industry Supply
1786 J.Forbes Baker & Co. Liverpool–Africa LR

1st slave voyage (1786): In this and her subsequent voyage Younger Hero sailed beneath an asiento, that awarded Baker and Dawson the fitting to carry and promote slaves in Spanish territories. Captain William Forbes sailed from Liverpool on 15 February 1786. Younger Hero arrived in Havana in July 1786 with 210 slaves. She arrived again at Liverpool on 1 December. She had left Liverpool with 17 workforce contributors and she or he had suffered two workforce deaths on her voyage.[5]

On 13 December Younger Hero, Mollineaux, grasp, sailed for Trinidad. He returned to Liverpool in overdue March or early April.

2d slave voyage (1787): Captain Thomas Molyneux sailed from Liverpool on 2 Might 1787.[b]Younger Hero arrived in Havana in September 1787. She arrived again at Liverpool on 5 November. She had left Liverpool with 16 workforce contributors and she or he had suffered no workforce deaths on her voyage.[6]

third slave voyage (1788–1789): Captain Molyneux sailed from Liverpool on 2 Might 1788. He bought slaves at Bonny, and at Bimbia. In January 1789 Younger Hero arrived at Trinidad and landed 118 slaves. She then sailed to Havana, and there landed 346 slaves.[c]Younger Hero sailed for Liverpool on 7 Might, and arrived there on 17 June.[7]

4th slave voyage (1789–1790): Captain Charles Walker Jones, sailed from Liverpool on Bastille Day 1789. Younger Hero began obtaining slaves on 16 September at Cape Coast Citadel. She arrived at Trinidad in March 1790 and sailed from there on 3 June. One day Captain Andrew Irving had changed Jones and she or he arrived again at Liverpool on 10 July, beneath Irving’s command.[8]

fifth slave voyage (1790–1792): Captain John Ainsworth sailed from Liverpool on 17 August 1790. Younger Hero began obtaining slaves on 14 November, first an Anomabu, after which at Cape Coast Citadel. She sailed from Africa on 5 November 1791, and arrived at Grenada in December. She had embarked 197 slaves and she or he arrived with 197 slaves. She sailed from Grenada on 20 December and arrived again at Liverpool on 10 February 1792. She had left Liverpool with 14 workforce contributors and had suffered one workforce loss of life on her voyage.[9]

sixth slave voyage (1792–1793): Captain William Martin sailed from Liverpool on 22 March 1792. He commenced obtaining slaves on 17 June at Cape Coast Citadel. Younger Hero arrived at Kingston on 17 January 1793 with 195 slaves. She arrived again at Liverpool on 30 April. She had left Liverpool with 14 workforce contributors and had suffered no workforce deaths on her voyage. One day at the voyage Captain John Clegg had changed Captain Martin.[10]

Yr Grasp Proprietor Industry Supply
1794 W.Martin
R.Worthington
Dawson & Co. Liverpool–Trinidad LR

seventh slave voyage (1793–1794): Captain M. Worthington sailed in Might 1794, in all probability from London. On 10 December Younger Hero arrived at “Antonia” with 136 slaves.[11] Antonia is more than likely Port Antonio, Jamaica.

Younger Hero was once seized and condemned within the West Indies.[11]

Notes, citations, & references[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ Baker and Dawson had been the biggest company of slave buyers in England.[1]
  2. ^ The trans-Atlantic slave business database reported that she had left Liverpool on 18 March,[6] however that was once no longer in keeping with the send arrival and departure (SAD) knowledge in Lloyd’s Record.
  3. ^ The choice of slaves is so massive relative to the scale of the vessel that it should constitute an error, or in all probability transshipment of slaves from Trinidad to Cuba.

Citations

References

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